Style Guide

Help us communicate effectively and consistently

We encourage our partners and students to help support The Consortium’s mission in all forms of communications. To support these initiatives, we provide the following style guide to ensure consistency and accuracy.

For questions about Consortium-related terms, grammar, language or logo approval, please contact Kurt Greenbaum, communications director, 636-681-5449 or greenbaumk@cgsm.org.

The Consortium Style Guide

In general, we default to Associated Press style when writing and editing. Below, we highlight certain exceptions or AP Style rules that we want to particularly note.

The Consortium Network
18 member schools
800-plus current students
8,000-plus alumni
75-plus corporate partners

The Consortium References
“The” is to be capitalized when referencing The Consortium. The full name of the organization is The Consortium for Graduate Study in Management.

In text, use Board of Trustees, Corporate Advisory Board on first reference. Thereafter, use “the board” or “the trustees.” Or “the advisory board.”

MBA
The preferred style is not to use periods to abbreviate Master of Business Administration.
When plural, use MBAs.
Use “an MBA.”

Member Schools
See this page for the list of The Consortium’s member schools by university and business school, with links and their year of entry into The Consortium. They appear on this page in alphabetical order.

Phone Numbers
Render phone numbers using hyphens: 636-681-5449.

Commonly Used Words or Phrases

Alumnus, alumni, alumna, alumnae
Use alumnus (alumni in the plural) when referring to a man who has attended a school.
Use alumna (alumnae in the plural) for similar references to a woman.
Use alumni when referring to a group of men and women.

Ampersand (&)
Use the ampersand only when it is part of a company’s formal name. The ampersand should not otherwise be used in place of “and” — with this exception: We use the ampersand when referring to The Consortium’s annual Orientation Program & Career Forum.

Capitalize
Proper nouns, months, days of the week, but not seasons

The official name of a department when used in text; do not capitalize the informal name
He enrolled in the Department of Economics
He enrolled in the economics department

Degrees
Bachelor of Fine Arts, but bachelor’s degree
Master of Philosophy, but master’s degree
Bachelor of Science in Computer Science
She holds a Bachelor of Science degree in computer science.

Use such abbreviations such as B.A., M.A., LL.D., and Ph.D. only when the need to identify many individuals by degree on first reference would make the preferred form cumbersome. Use these abbreviations only after a full name – never after just a last name. When used after a name, an academic abbreviation is set off by commas.
Daniel Moynihan, Ph.D., spoke.

Numbers
Spell a numeral at the beginning of a sentence.
Spell out whole numbers below 10, use figures for 10 and above.
Use numerals for ages; dimensions (6 feet); time; percentages (8 percent)
Spell out first through ninth. Starting with 10th use figures.
For numbers larger than 999, include a comma preceding the hundredth place. For example 1,000 or 234,567.

Possessives
Generally, add apostrophe S, except in cases of plural nouns ending in S, or singular proper names ending in S, when we would add only an apostrophe (i.e., Achilles’ heel, Agnes’ book, Dickens’ novels).

States
In print copy, spell out the names of U.S. states when they stand alone. Use abbreviations in conjunction with the name of a city, county, town, village or military base. The following states have no abbreviation: Alaska, Hawaii, Idaho, Iowa, Maine, Ohio, Texas, Utah.

Ala.
Ariz.
Ark.
Calif.
Colo.
Conn.
Del.
Fla.
Ga.
Ill.
Ind.
Kan.
Ky.
La.
Md.
Mass.
Minn.
Miss.
Mo.
Mont.
Neb.
Nev.
N.H.
N.J.
N.M.
N.Y.
N.C.
N.D.
Okla.
Ore.
Pa.
R.I.
S.C.
S.D.
Tenn.
Vt.
Va.
Wash.
W.Va.
Wis.
Wyo.

For mailing addresses, use the two-letter postal abbreviations only with full addresses, including ZIP code. You can find these abbreviations here.

Titles
Capitalize formal titles used directly before an individual’s name. Use lowercase when titles come after an individual’s name.

President Barack Obama
Barack Obama, president of the United States

Titles: Referencing Composition Titles
For book titles, computer game titles, movie titles, opera titles, play titles, poem titles, album and song titles, radio and television program titles, and the titles of lectures, speeches and works of art, put quotation marks around the names of all such works except the Bible and books that are primarily catalogs of reference material.

Time
Use figures except for noon and midnight. Use a colon to separate hours from minutes. Put a space after the number and use lowercase for a.m. and p.m.
11 a.m.
1 p.m.
3:30 p.m.

Commonly Used Words

  • cell phone, smart phone (two words)
  • email
  • fundraising
  • home page
  • internet – The worldwide research network of computers communicating in a common language — TCP-IP — over telephone or fiber-optic lines (now lowercased in all uses per AP Stylebook, June 2016)
  • multicultural
  • nonprofit
  • online
  • prospective student
  • R.S.V.P.
    R.S.V.P.s
    R.S.V.P.’ d
  • underrepresented
  • U.S.
  • website

Formatting
Use one space after periods in sentences.

Logos
Download approved Consortium logos.
Download The Consortium Identity Guide.

Grammar
Commas – Put commas between items in a list, but not before the final FOR, AND, NOR, BUT, OR and YET.

Example – The Consortium is an alliance of MBA programs, corporate partners, current students and alumni.